jump to navigation

Matching Environment to People (Notes from May 27 – June 2, 2019) June 20, 2019

Posted by Anthony in Automation, Blockchain, Digital, experience, finance, Founders, global, Hiring, Leadership, questions, social, Strategy, Uncategorized, WomenInWork.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
add a comment

In this particularly busy week, I found the theme of the week to be particularly amusing, but coincidentally or not, the dominoes fell that way. Normally, a theme arises like that because everyone is in finance or the same segment or conference is aligning. I just happened to catch a week where the insight that I drew from each person reflected similarly.

Meredith Golden, a dating consultant of sorts, discussed how she assesses all levels of dating profiles for her clients. She goes through a process that she’s dialed in to obtain her optimum level of clients as well as the right approaches to proceed. Asking herself what she wanted was key in determining how she’s grown her business, especially as an entrepreneur and CEO.

Chief Instigator Matt Charney. Now that’s a fun title. And I won’t ruin it. He goes through his past with Disney and Warner Bros and why/how he moved into the HR tech doing marketing – what he saw and how it’s different now. Fascinating and fun segment.

Part of the fun of being an entrepreneur is deciding who you want to do business with. But when it’s difficult, especially at the start, you’re most excited to get ANYONE to work with (unless you luck into that massive customer to start – rare rare rare). This is Kyle Jones of iCRYO found out. Then he gained traction, quickly, and realized he needed to be a bit more diligent in who he wanted to work with – what was ideal for the business, as well as the brand moving forward.

David Epstein likes throwing wrenches, I imagine. He authored the book Range, testing the generalist vs specialist question. As a generalist masquerading currently as a specialist, I appreciated what he was talking about the strength of generalists. But I do understand the place that specialists have in our society, especially deep tech, research and other exceptional areas.

Deb DeHaas grew up under the tutelage of her mother who fought the idea of being an accountant growing up to learn and adapt to the idea of being told what she could/couldn’t do wasn’t ACTUALLY an assessment of her ability to do those things. Such a simple, fascinating concept. She could totally be an accountant, engineer, as she pleased. Took a lot of perseverance but she had a manager at Andersen (before folding) who was a woman and told her to always chase what she wanted – now she’s leading the Inclusion and Diversity team with Deloitte’s Corp Governance Arm. Quite the story of growing up and what she learned.

Not to be outdone, Kim Wilford, who acted as General Counsel for GoFundMe, discussed how she came into her role in charge of the nonprofit arm, and what they’ve done in growing the company and its donations. How to connect marketing, wearing multiple hats and helping people help others. Inspirational while metric-driven, not just dream-built.

I hope you enjoy the notes – a few I didn’t write extra here but had fascinating insights into Happiness Hacking, investing in founders and how they grew companies such as Vroom and GoodEggs. Let me know what you think!

  • Meredith Golden (@mergoldenSMS), CEO of Spoon Meets Spoon (Wharton XM)
    logo-4-300x187

    • Talking about having 6-7 clients
    • Ghostwriting messages
    • Client work depends – assessing / diagnosing the problem
      • Not matching (pictures), profile, messaging, getting them to meet, etc…
    • Metrics based on what the initial diagnosis was
  • Matt Charney, Executive Editor – Chief instigator at RecruitingDaily (Wharton XM)
    screen-shot-2014-06-22-at-2.46.49-pm

    • Talking about workplace and conspiracies

 

 

  • Kyle Jones, iCRYO Franchises (Wharton XM)
    icryo-cryotherapy-logo-uai-720x433-5-3-300x181

    • Franchising initially – would’ve been a bit pickier when starting but too excited to land first deals
    • Out of 100 franchises, they’ll go with ~5 or so
    • 10 franchises, working on doing a big deal to launch 100+

 

  • David Epstein (@davidepstein), author of Range (Wharton XM)
    43260847

    • Discussed how Nobel laureates and creative types are often generalists that spend a lot of time learning / making
      • Stumble on new ideas or concepts in their work
    • Generalists aren’t bad – allow to see a different perspective and combine ideas
      • Think “The Quants” – relationship between corn prices compared to research on _

 

 

 

  • Deb DeHaas (@deborahdehaas), Chief Inclusion Officer, C4Corp Gov Deloitte (Women at Work)
    gx-global-center-for-corporate-governance-new-promo

    • Discussed her mother, who had passed away at the age of 90 recently, who was told she couldn’t be an accountant
      • Wasn’t her role – she pursued it anyhow and ended up being an engineer before quitting and being a community leader
    • Worked in Gulf Oil’s accounting dept and helped her husband through med school
      • First councilwoman in her town, elder at the church
    • Deb started at Andersen until it folded, worked for only one woman but she was taught there were no barriers
  • Bentley Hall (@bhallca), CEO of Good Eggs (Wharton xm)
  • Mitch Berg, CTO of Vroom (Wharton XM)
    mb_vroom_id_1
  • Alex Salkever (@alexsalkever), Vivek Wadhwa, authors “Your Happiness… Hacked” (Wharton XM)
    • With Stew Friedman, finding the middle ground of tech with children / teenagers and the happy medium
    • How is it that we find some things appealing but others are a burden
    • Facebook being a publishing agency – aren’t they responsible for what the product? “Newsfeed” example.
    • Google Maps or Waze as a hindrance at the local level – dangerous, maybe?
      • Extremely valuable, still, in new places / out of the country, especially
        • Different, maybe, for walking if alternative is talking and communicating with others
    • Problem with Facebook / Whatsapp – Whatsapp unmoderated group chats and only requiring a phone number
      • Encrypted, but what cost? Facebook – for Vivek, just limits to 1-way action
    • Social media as killing people – think India’s problems
  • Ed Sim (@edsim), FP @ Boldstart Ventures (20min VC 092)
    page_55dc6912ed2231e37c556b6d_bsv_logo_v15.3

    • LivePerson, GoToMeeting are 2 of his biggest investments as lead, exited / public
    • Started a fund in 1998, DonTreader Ventures – left in 2010
      • Idea was to bring SV style to NY – VCs would look at financials / models, but they looked at people and product – focus on markets
      • Most investors were corporate but cratered after 2008
    • Started a new seed fund for sticking with what he knew as well as recognizing a shift in 2007 for open source and cloud – consumer-based
    • SaaSify vertical markets with GoToMeeting founders who wanted to do new things – $1mln, $1.5mln
      • Enterprise people were looking to get a market for small ~$1mln investments
    • Hated starting a fund – “Fundraising sucks.” – Could find a great enterprise and tech entrepreneurs at seed stage – got $1mln and made 10 inv
      • First 5-6 investments were less than $5million pre-$, sold 4 by 2012 – had option values for series A or being sold to strategic companies
        • Entrepreneurs wanted to sell in those cases, but with cloud, definitely found that it was reasonable and cheaper to do SaaS
    • First / second generation founders or single vs others – “No single founders”
      • As the first institutional round, they’re first big money in. Last few investments were second or more founders – little bigger rounds
      • If first-gen founders, funding rounds are smaller – deep expertise in their field (and have to be engineers building product)
    • “Enterprise can be fucking hard” – have to know the industry – he has 20 years, partner has 10 and new partner as building 5 companies
      • Why he went this route? Started at JP Morgan as building quant trading models as liaison Business QA between engineers and portfolio managers
        • Derivatives models to real-time pricing models – feeds from Reuters or others, risk metrics and crank out the other side
      • Enterprise was exciting to him
    • Could take enterprise founders and redo or build a new company by changing the pain point – customers can be repeat because new pain point
      • Harder to do that in consumer
    • Leads come from founders – roughly 75% as recommendations from portfolio companies (wants to be first thought or call)
      • Helps founders get their pick and decide where to go – if you have an analyst report, may not be a great market opportunity initially
    • Environment of seed funding: Jeff Clovier of SoftTech as one of few microVC’s and now it’s 400+
      • Just want to be hyper-focused and being nimble – main value add as understanding the cadence (2 founders coding together to selling)
      • Stratification of VC – best ones have gotten so large that they can’t write small checks efficiently
        • Entrepreneurs don’t want $5-10mil immediately out of the gate – mismatch, looking for less for less dilution
      • Deal flow of crowdfunding: says sometimes they will leave $250k after leading for AngelList or building new relationships
    • Jason Calcanis blog Launch Ticker, trend as rise of the developer (multiple people in company using same thing – buying licensing)
      • Messaging as another interesting trend in the enterprise space – his most used app – Slack (SlackLine – private, external channels)
    • Most recent investment – stealth investment in a repeat founder (founded and sold before) – security focused on developer
  • Kim Wilford, General Counsel at GoFundMe (Wharton XM)
    go_fund_me_logo_courtesy_web_t670

    • Talking about joining, hadn’t considered nonprofit space
      • For profit arm and the nonprofit
    • Mentioning pushing marketing and following metrics for raising vs donations
    • Can influence news stations and push for higher engagement
    • Done almost $5bn in funding across 50 million donations
Advertisements

How to Humanize Data for Enhancement (Notes from May 20 – 26, 2019) June 12, 2019

Posted by Anthony in Automation, Blockchain, Digital, experience, finance, Founders, global, Hiring, Leadership, NFL, questions, social, Strategy, Uncategorized, WomenInWork.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
add a comment

I’m going to keep this brief this week, as I’m trying out an added format of posting. I believe I’m going to test Nuzzel news to connect and share the links of articles I’ve read through the week (maybe once or twice – weekend one out on Monday, and another for the week through Thursday?). This post, concentrating on my week’s podcast or segment listens, will still go out. That’s my goal, though.

The week I listened to these, I was actually on my way to Monterrey with my family, though, so I had a solid 90 minutes each way to go through some longer episodes – thankfully, I found Doug’s take on culture and leading a community with Eat Club very insightful, as well as a blockchain discussion by the a16z squad particularly fun.

With the news and media focused on AI, Bias, Diversity and Ethics of ML and scariness of algorithms, it’s good to hear opinions that are focused, but thoughtful on the premise of what is being proposed. In a vacuum, yes, these can be dangerous. However, that’s not often the case when models are being deployed into production. Some are unintentional or started with a simple question of relationships (think Cambridge Analytica and how it started via Likes research on music at Facebook). That’s not necessarily justification for something that clearly had a large impact, but we’d like to know that teams are improving and have that awareness now more than ever before. That’s a positive.

I believe that these episodes, though, take a bit more of a nuanced approach of mathematics and numbers and attributes a human eye that has acquired the necessary expertise to design better models or come up with a better framework for action. We hear that with Dan Waterhouse of Balderton Capital (of a delightful Applied Math degree), who had to learn to apply more of an operational and human/market behavior investor since he had the metrics focus while learning. Then, a fascinating segment with Laura Edell, a sports fan, who struggled to believe that the metrics that were widely accepted as ‘most accurate’ (re: not necessarily max accuracy) included all components of what could be measurable – made some assumptions to test based on twitter/media analysis and coupled it with the data that was widely acceptable to come up with an excellent Final 4 Model.

To continue the theme, not to be outdone, Geoffrey Batt and Nikos Moraitakis each spoke of differing aspects of metrics that they honed in on and ignored the common threads of why those weren’t valid, despite what they saw as opportunities. Geoffrey as it pertained to Iraq investing and Nikos in the form of starting and building a company in Greece, not exactly the traditional hotbed. However, each persisted and are successful today – so there’s a lesson in doing the things that we want to do.

Remember, ultimately, numbers and averages usually take the aggregate, collection of those that may not have had the timing, willingness or ability to push but with enough persistence and support, some will certainly persevere.

Hope you enjoy!

  • Doug Leeds (@leedsdoug), CEO at Eat Club (Dot Complicated, Wharton XM)
    cropped-logo-highres1

    • Talking about going from Ask.com to Eat Club – other companies, as well
    • Quiz leading in was on different likes/dislikes
      • Harry Potter-themed eating pop-ups
      • Anti-spoiler pin (digital, season and episode to avoid conflict)
        • Anything was good that brings community together
        • Said that there were employees at work that took off Monday after GoT finale since they hadn’t watched
    • Delivery people are employees, not contractors – become regulars at corporate events and a part of the culture
      • Help build the culture of the locations – food and how they match
      • Building culture of Eat Club with improv – ability to improve skills there, as well
    • Eat Club numbers – 1000+ companies served, about 25k lunches provided
      • Regional difference of Indian focus in NorCal, Mexican focus in SoCal
        • Acquired an Indian food provider for new techniques – Intero?
        • Acquired another, as well
  • Five Open Problems Toward Building Blockchain Computer (a16z 5/16/19)
    ah-logo-sm

    • Ali Yahya (@ali01), Frank Chen and looking at crypto
    • New paradigm has to improve upon one or two particular ways for new applications, but likely sucks in most others
      • Mobile phone as enabling behaviors for instagram/uber and such with camera and gps in the phones
      • Have to trust the company currently to do what they claim to be doing – trust Google with so much to have the interactions
      • Now, have a computational fabric that separates the control of human power, self-policing and security bottom-up
    • Difference in communication cost – bounded on the end by speed of light
    • Trying to make networking efficient – miners propogating to other miners – blockchain distribution network
      • 1 MB vs 2 MB blocks but can kill some small miners
      • Agreeing on blocks or updates are final
    • Non-probabilistic vs fast – need to be faster than 60 minutes, for instance
      • Improvements on networking layer with Ethereum 2.0, Cosmo and cost or Proof of Stake (vs Of Work)
        • Who gets to participate? PoW requires everyone to compute an expensive proof of work.
        • PoS – intrinsic token that you have to own in order to buy participation, 2% ownership says 2% of the say to say yay or nay
        • Cost of participating is less expensive because it’s intrinsic
      • Practical for everyday use, small interactions between people and machines or people
      • Trust as the bottleneck to scale
    • 3 Pillars of Computation/Scalability: Throughput, latency, cost per instruction
  • Daniel Waterhouse (@wanderingvc), GP at Balderton Capital (20min VC 091)
    cqis46nlxvy5bkvj15kh

    • Sits on boards of Top10, ROLI, Lovecrafts, TrademarkNow etc
    • Was 5 year partner at Wellington Partners and invested in EyeEm, Hailo, Yplan, Bookatable, SumAll, Readmill (sold to DropBox), Qype (sold to Yelp)
    • Break in 1999 by getting to work at Yahoo for about 10 years before getting to venture in 2009
    • Applied Math background, tend to understand complexity and appreciate solutions in technology – different experience for entrepreneurs
      • Learned to be less metric-driven – less obsessed on numbers and data, more human and market dynamics
    • Operators vs career VCs – successful firms take different skills at different times
      • Exit, raising money, portfolio management, scaling, growing
      • Important to watch how a business is grown, whether it’s yourself or by being a long-term investor or close in other ways
    • Entrepreneurship as a career path and as a global one, investors in similar mindset and ambition – can take it anywhere
    • More seed capital and smaller checks than later in Europe at this time – maybe more competition higher stages
    • Thinks that consumerizing SMB software has a lot of room to grow, as well as enterprise software – easier UI-driven tools
      • Developments in AI – mentioned real-time trademark analysis (TradeMarkNow, for instance)
      • How to give great recommendations after gathering consumer tastes and insights
    • Book: The Brain That Teaches Itself – neuroplasticity of the brain
    • The first $10mln you invest, you’ll lose – advice
    • Overhyped sector: food delivery; Neglected: apply behavioral science to tech problems
    • Favorite blog/sector: longs for better content – thought TC was great when it was started, but now it’s Medium individual articles
    • Most recent investment Curious.ai – made it in 40 minutes & ambition was compelling
  • Geoffrey Batt (@geoffreysbatt), Nature of Transformational Returns (Invest Like the Best, 4/9/19)
    • Iraqi equities – history of asset classes
      • Time and patience is a big factor for how you look for results
      • Japan, for instance, 1950 – 1989 100,000% return but now is still below the peak from 1980
    • May have a decade of not working out return-wise
      • Nothing to show for investments, incredibly challenging, especially now – hedge funds or LPs
        • Reporting weekly or daily basis, long-term investment could be 6 months or 1 year – pulling money after first issue
      • Hard to ride out periods of long-term returns (think: re-rating countries)
    • LPs as agreeing to the time horizon – maybe investment committees that are making decisions on career-risk for institutions
      • Iraq to one of those – not likely to get paid off if it works, but if it doesn’t, get demoted or fired
      • Had to approach HNW and family funds – adjacency risk for people next to seed investors (if one is weighted on fund)
    • As student, he majored in psychology – said there was a guy in the seminar class that was a unique thinker
      • Daniel Cloud had co-founded a fund that invested in post-Soviet Russia before doing his PhD
      • Asked Geoffrey to come work for him and learn investment markets
    • Wanted to find next big thing – first, find a place that everyone thinks is awful (in 2007, this was Iraq)
      • Does perception meet reality? How many people dying in the war every month?
      • Country portrayed as “failed state” but oil production was increasing, CPI was 75% yoy but now 5-10%
        • Currency appreciating against the dollar, now civilian casualties in a month were down to 200 from thousands
      • Normal visit to Baghdad – mundane here, out-of-place was that 2 guys in middle of afternoon were playing tennis, kicking soccer
        • Visit companies, stock exchange, meet executives, go to a restaurant, how easy is it to hail a cab, get around
        • Critical process of infrastructure – are people paying in dollars (bad sign), local currency?
    • News media is just not set up to convey complexity to the audience – alienate, progressivism as a service, readers change
      • Experts don’t have skin in the game so they don’t face career risk – betrayal if you suggest otherwise, likely (even if true)
    • On his first trip, mentions Berkshire – early 1990s where they first invest in Wells Fargo
      • Managerial skill in banking is paramount if levered 20:1 (make 5% mistake and you’re done)
        • Don’t want average banks at great prices – want great banks at slightly unreasonable prices (thought about this in Iraq)
      • CEO of first Iraqi bank – unsecured loans to taxi drivers – less likely to take out the loan “between you and I, I’m a cowboy”
      • Entrepreneurs in these areas have to be better than others because of the instability vs the stable environments
    • Stock and capital guys – stock may trade at 3x earnings or 4-5x FCF, top and bottom lines growing at 20% per year
      • Usually just put there as knowing someone powerful but they can be bigger as allocators
      • 2008-09: Size at the time of the stock market – traded 3 days a week, 10am – 12pm on a white board
        • 60-70 companies, maybe 20 suspended from trading because 0 annual report – $1.8bn, smaller than Palestinian market
      • High growth company that is super opaque – can’t meet or won’t meet with CEO, maybe some others that state-owned enterprises that just want to keep paying salaries; maybe 5-10 companies that are investable
        • Equally weighted these companies initially and was still learning – now, he developed relationships and is on the board for companies
      • Does he want to put more $ and concentrate on the companies that he trusts and follows the guide
    • Largest holding for them – Baghdad Soft Drinks (Pepsi bottling and distribution for Iraq) – mixed-owned enterprise in the 90s
      • Local businessman (Pepsi is the dominating market share – ~70-80% vs elsewhere where it’s split) saw it was mismanaged
      • By 2008-09, were going to default on the loan they were floated – businessman bought the loan, fired management & 2000 ee’s, switched equity
        • Within a year, it was fully certified, tripled production, profitable business
    • Now, 5 days a week but still 2 days a week – had foreign investor interest, $5-6bn, couple IPOs successful
      • One telecom has about $1bn market cap, 14.5% dividend yield, 33%+ FCF yield
      • Foreign money came in 2013 but ISIS scared them off – coming back and interest from banks – arranging trips and momentum
      • Key problem – no 3rd party custodians (compared to Jamaica or even in Africa, HSBC or anything) – working on getting one
        • Makes it difficult to bring in foreign money – exchange is the custodian (which is actually safe)
        • No margins, cash-based market and settlements of t+0, no short selling (can’t sell unless have stock)
      • Oil collapse depressed prices and ISIS issue but has been up over last 2-3+ years, cheaper today than when he invested 11 years ago
    • Multiple expansion is the question for returns – 1x to 25x or 4x to 15x – depends on what they are as compounding
    • Kobe Bryant complimented him after a junior year game in high school – already looked at as a superstar – saw Geoffrey was dejected
  • Nikos Moraitakis (@moraitakis), Founder, CEO Workable (20min VC FF024)
    yawnofc__400x400

    • VP of BD at Upstream, enterprise sales in 40 countries in 4 continents
    • Wanted to start a company with type of what they wanted – centered around product, engineering company, starting in Greece
    • SMB over Fortune 500 because of product-focused and not corporation or enterprise-based
    • Applicant-tracking systems (ATS) – keep track of arcane process, don’t want to touch things – collaborative processes
      • Simple interface to solve problem of recruiting model (which is still 50+ years old)
    • Problems aren’t location-based – they’re conceptual – designing product, PMF
      • Opening with $500k or 50-200k if needing to get started, not necessarily $5-10mln like other markets or tech hubs, industry
      • Hiring engineers that are good in Greece isn’t so much a problem if you have a good company and network to attract talent
      • Moved to US not for VCs (doing good business, VCs pay attention) but they had 50% of customers without having anyone in US
        • Wanted to start customer support infrastructure, services and otherwise
        • Talked about marketing or accounting businesses on tech that taught companies that it may be worth it to update
    • Metrics that he pays attention to: month-to-month above $2mln annual revenue, ratio of new biz and lost biz
      • Not celebrating fundraising – few drinks but says it’s like having new shoes at the start of a marathon
      • Talking about investors and the relationships built to work together
  • Jaz Banga (@jsbanga), cofounder, CEO of Airspace Systems (Wharton XM)
    airspace-metal-crest2x

    • Meeting Earl, cofounder and maker, at Burning Man – drone being annoying above him while he did tai-chi
    • Prototyping the interceptor drones after seeing military request proposals – had an issue with drone over nuclear subs
    • Can place thermal scans and other security or rescue methods
  • The Transformer (Data Skeptic 5/3/19)
    • Encoder/decoder architecture of vector embeddings word2vec into a more contextual use case
    • Keyword lookup may not work (using ex of bank – river bank vs financial)
      • Humans at 95%+ accuracy, computer maybe around 50%
      • Encoding as correct interpretations and weights for context – emulating process
  • Laura Edell (@laura_e_edell) from MS Build 2019, NCAA predictions on Spark (Data Skeptic 5/9/19)
    build-2019-intro

    • Been at Microsoft for 3 years, supporting Azure for all their customers – quantum physics and statistics background from school
    • ML in cloud for customers – don’t know why they want it, just think it will be useful
      • Ex: image recognition (on techs with bodycams), HVAC documentation and augmentation or signal processing in anomalies of wave patterns
        • holoLENS use case
      • Played 2 sounds for Build presentation – her son blowing on her arm vs HVAC system custom sound – training sets and transfer learning
    • Can take a few real image and do a bunch for training: rotating, zoom, Gaussian blur, cut out background
      • Sound – same: take out environment, pauses and silence
      • Can turn 10 images / sounds into 30-50 per class
    • Active learning: model over time that can train itself and then retrain itself
    • Business domain expertise – her Final 4 model
      • #1 feature was wins, 2nd SoS, 3rd home court advantage / location – let machine validate the expertise
      • Validation of revenue drivers from machine – more importantly, if the opposite occurs – revenue doesn’t agree with data features
        • Used statistics to train data from the start in football, sports data – ncaa – teams, tourneys, prior history
          • Brought in her assumption of player-social index where they scraped sentiment and video analysis for team effects
        • Chose to use Azure Databricks (Spark background), store it in Blob and only retraining on Just-in-time in a Docker image
      • ML Flow, set of score for model – training set and .py and score.py or source data gets grouped together in Azure
        • Docker pulls them together easily and image is built, Azure DevOps can do VC

Thinking Through Data (Notes from May 13 – 19, 2019) June 5, 2019

Posted by Anthony in Automation, Blockchain, Digital, education, experience, Founders, global, Hiring, Leadership, medicine, questions, social, Strategy, Uncategorized.
add a comment

This week we had a hefty dose of medicine, biotech and data discussions. However, it isn’t just focused on the technology and innovation for these incredible people, but rather the frameworks of the thought process that goes in to their decision-making. We can ask “Where did we go wrong?” or “What assumption do we make that should/would be challenged?”

Annie Duke is excellent in assessing this on the spot, but she sheds light on the steps she takes to get to that level. Much of what we believe / view tends to be outcome-based, which is fine because that’s easiest to see. However, it’s rarely consistent in the path to get to that success point once we change the problem. That’s what we should focus on – consistent thought processes to make strategic decisions. Outcomes are one metric of measuring the decisions, but not an end-all, be-all.

AI mixes with a few of our guests, including Mir Imran and Eric Topol. How does it play a part in how we will progress? What may AI teach us about our historical research? Are there more optimal methods of delivery?

Emily Oster and Hanne Tidnam discussed societal effects of technology and decision-making. With technology becoming more and more ingrained as a part of everyday life, is there a point-of-no-return or is it okay generally? Or, is there a limit? Time will certainly tell – studies / surveys don’t have the information available to give us any insight since the time-scale is so recently biased. Technology has outpaced the level at which we can make data-driven decisions in this manner.

Bruno Goncalves discussed text mapping and language processing for how different dialects of the same language can indicate demographic patterns in various locations (focused initially in Brazil). He mentioned it was interesting to track words / phrases and how they changed throughout history for English, primarily – harder to track Spanish. If there’s more data available (say, mobile text / audio or email?), may be easier to break down by parts of towns/cities, but currently, it was limited to general, larger blocks based on Twitter text (which is sparse, generally, anyway).

Suranga of Balderton Capital discussed his movement from London to San Francisco and what he’d observed as a tech employee, then executive and founder and the difference between the environments. His excitement for the future comes from the societal change that infrastructure of technology may enable. Then there was a darker side when we heard the author of Ghost Work – Mary Gray – as she said there is a larger split of work designed for specificity as we improve the AI / ML models that have been deployed. What is needed work-wise or what can be automated? Are those good? Biased? We’ll see.

I hope you enjoy my notes and hopefully you’ll check out a few that sound interesting! Thanks again to the people that continue to keep me up to date with what I love to learn.

  • Eric Topol (@EricTopol), author of Deep Medicine, cardiologist (Wharton XM)
    deep-medicine-cover
  • Deep AI and medicine – asking how to properly apply deep learning or AI to medicine
  • Yet to have a drug made by AI
  • Bayesian principles failing in medicine community
    • 12% of women get breast cancer, yet we ask them to do 1-2 years mammograms
      • 10 year span, 60% will get a false positive (yikes!)
    • Adopters of Apple Watch and its cardiogram / heart information are treated unilaterally
      • Young, healthy and curious people may not have any arrythmia so any abnormality (totally normal) may be misdiagnosed
        • Signal from heart rhythm from one person may be different from another
    • Says it’s a sign of being behind (3rd industrial vs 4th for the rest) when Stethoscope (invented 200+ years ago) is still sign of industry
      • Analog, no option of recording and is still very subjective to the doctor listening
      • This, despite advances in imaging and scans otherwise
  • Mir Imran, Chairman & CEO of Rani Therapeutics (Bay Area Ventures)
    21bf244196ea49469935c6e51910eec6

    • Talked about the big equity stake his fund took in the company, wanting it to be a big hit
    • Drug development, say, an insulin pill compared to injections (spent 150+ years on solving this)
      • Stomach / pill form in past is only 0.5% or < 1 % efficacy – can’t intake that many pills or cost-effective
    • Designing pill that is pH-shell-dependent to identify intestine pain receptors are limited (can inject no problem)
      • Pill recognizes pH change by dissolving outer shell (to pass thru stomach), then sugar-needle injects
      • 1000s of animal trials and just passing pills
      • Started trials ~18 months ago in Australia for pill traveling (using x-rays every 30 min to track)
        • Then progressed into drug for giantism, along with looking at other biologic diseases / solutions
    • Don’t want to limit biologics to a single buyer (Novartis, Genentech, etc…) – keep it open
      • Investments from Novartis and Google initially ~$150mln worth now
  • Mapping Dialects with Twitter Data (Data Skeptic 4/26/2019)
    • With Bruno Goncalves about work studying language – now @ Morgan Stanley
    • Started with research in CS and Physics, moved eventually to Apache weblogs, email, big router logs, Twitter conversations to study human behavior
      • Turned into looking at Twitter check-ins with the log using longitude and latitude
      • Language used: order maps, areas dominated by specific language (drawing boundary between French and Belgian in Belgium, for instance)
        • Intermingling cities that attract many languages
    • Spanish changing from one areas to another – everyday words, phrases
      • Can use the location data to determine the area of dialects – splitting Brazil, for instance (South, North and then central American)
      • Dividing grid cells into km x km – maybe not determinate of gradients of English vs Spanish since they were testing dialects of Spanish
    • Each row corresponds to each cell and words, but the matrix essentially loses the meaning
      • Ran PCA analysis and K-means on the clustering
    • He’s gathered 10 tb of data from Twitter, corpora and looking at millions of tweets – too few data to look over time
      • Measuring language changes over time was difficult for Spanish, but easier with English
      • Used Google books, for each language and counting bi-grams in how many books – popularity of words
        • Corpus of books published in UK vs US for Google books (1800 – 2010) for reliable data, but further back was less popular
        • Could normalize for words on how American vs British words were (and the mixture)
    • Recently, looking at demographic splits of language now with more digital / online presence
    • Training spellcheck based on dialect or demographic splits
    • Doing this stuff part-time now – how to train a model to detect use of language in this sense
      • Using word embeddings to detect automatic meanings of slang to determine the different meanings
  • Matt Turck with Plaid co-founder, Podcast
  • CSR in Gaming Industry,  (Wharton XM)
    • Discussing how it can be weird to gain competitive advantage and share
    • CSR as large subjective to the person looking in
    • Gaming companies chip in to gambling addiction hotlines / help / etc
    • Particularly in Las Vegas / NV, CSR survey determined that direct opportunities in water conservation, energy and green energy
      • How can they more efficiently run such large operations
    • Survey had about 80% of the gaming industry represented, from servicers to manufacturers to casinos themselves
  • Suranga Chandratillake, GP at Balderton Capital (20min VC 090)
    balderton-capital-logo-1

    • Founded blinkx, intelligent search engine for video/audio content in Cambridge in 2004
      • Lead company for 8 years as CEO through journey to SF, building a profitable biz and going public in London
    • Early ee at Autonomy Corp, engineer in R&D and then CTO when he went to SF
    • Belief in technical person shouldn’t be CEO – idea has been replaced in US (probably split)
      • Jack Dorsey, Zuckerberg (went into Dorsey and the idea 2 companies that aren’t really overlapping)
    • Been impressed by both Gates and Zuckerberg
      • Knowing the code and going through to understand everything
      • Zuckerberg’s acquisition of Instagram (ridiculed for $12bn and how right he was – surpassed Twitter’s users)
    • 2 Things for Tech going forward – changing infrastructure
      • VR and including drones or autonomous vehicles – hardware progression and mobile phones for what CAN be done
      • Societal difference – how we change to gig economy or how we work and spend time each day
    • Changing investments – just announced investment in Curious.ai
      • Shorter term where society is changing (eg: Nutmeg for planning pension plans, cheaper and available)
    • Structure for Balderton as equal partner VC – not sure it’s the most efficient model, but thinks it’s the best
      • Equal partnership where the partners have all the same number of votes, compensation and identical split
        • Removes the politics and impacts the partners and the stakeholders (founders that may be affected)
      • No single group that can carry the vote – hiring becomes very difficult because you need an equal
    • Knowing when to stick and when to switch
      • Deciding when to say “We don’t do that” and pivoting and being right
    • Exciting company for investment that he’s done recently – Cloud9
      • All development being done in the cloud now
  • Nick Leschly, CEO Bluebird Bio (Wharton XM)
    bluebird-bio

    • Purpose Built, 5/14/19

 

 

  • A Guide to Making Decisions (a16z 5/12/19)
    • Emily Oster, Hanne Tidnam discussion
    • Health and personal spaces – “right” thing isn’t a difference for some
      • Cocoa crispies, eggs and the preference for why you eat them, not just health-related
    • Impact of breast feeding vs not and looking against obesity
      • Less likely to be obese if breast feeding
      • Random trial for this is from Belarus in the 1990s where they requested parents to some breast fed
      • Siblings in choice to breast feed – almost no correlation if they did or did not
    • Constrained optimization – money or time
      • As parent, making choices based on preferences but have constraints
      • Recency bias for current literature – only data will be problematic and that it can only support a relation
    • Regression discontinuity as drawing a line and then seeing interventions and how they may change or affect outcomes
    • Screen time as having evidence that’s just very poor
      • Not easy to run randomized trial on – iPad or lifestyle would have to change for trial
      • Apps in short term doesn’t have the info available for results / outcomes
      • Studies currently don’t have any conclusions on phones/tablets – little
      • Bayesian updating on uncertainty – if 2 year old spends 50% of waking hours, that’s bad. Where’s the limit?
    • Last time went to doctor – very concretely made a recommendation of “2 hours max in a day”
      • How does the information get to that level of the system?
      • Conversations occur with doctors where they essentially make the lines that stick, pass on
    • Recommendations go out as arbitrary but now are made as truth – terrible without the decision
      • People that take the recommendations are likely more different or health-conscious
        • Added another layer (vitamin E, for instance) – those that adopted did many other things
    • Just be wrong with confidence – can be right, lots of good options
  • Innovating in Bets (a16z 5/8/19)
    • Annie Duke (@AnnieDuke), Pmarca, smc90
      annie-duke-thinking-in-bets-199x300
    • Every organization and individual makes countless decisions every day, under conditions of uncertainty.
    • Thought experiment: posing Seahawks run the ball and are stopped vs passing and throwing pick
      • Once there’s a result, it’s very difficult to work backwards to assess the decision quality was.
        • Outcome was so bad – it was in the skill bucket. Or – oh, there was uncertainty.
      • Very slow in NFL, for instance, to adopt analytics according to the numbers
      • 4th and 1 – should unanimously go for it since numbers say the other team will get 3, expected
    • As a decision maker, we likely choose the route that keeps us from getting yelled at
      • We allow uncertainty to bubble to surface – conflicted interest – long run vs short term
      • 2×2 matrix of consensus vs nonconsensus and right vs wrong
        • CR fine, NC-R genius, CW – fine (all agreed), NC – W really bad
        • Outcomes are right and wrong – hard to swipe the outcomes away
      • Thinking or allowing uncertainty in human driving and killing a human vs autonomous vehicle
        • Black box not understanding autonomous vs THINKING understanding another human (“Didn’t MEAN to do it”)
    • Anybody in business – process, process, process
      • R/E business – everybody in room after appraisal is 10% lower vs 10% higher (similar analysis)
      • Outcomes come from good process – try to align that an individual’s risk matches with corporation’s
        • Rightest risk – model could be correct (tail result) or risk decision (and deploying resources)
    • Most companies don’t have SITG – how to drive accountability in a process-driven environment so results matter?
      • How do you create balance so outcome caring about is the quality of forecast?
        • State the model of the world, places and what you think. How close are you to the forecast?
      • When you have a bad outcome and you’re in the room?
        • How many times do people say “Should we have lost more? Should we have lost less?”
      • Learning loss – negative direction on how to figure out? Poker example of betting X, X-C or X+C
        • Bet X and get a quick call. Should’ve done X+C (learn, regardless of opposite getting a card)
    • How much can you move an individual to train thinking? Naturally, thinking in forecasts more. Will have reaction and lessons quicker.
      • Getting through facts quickly and having the negative feedback – not robots
      • Improved 2% which is amazing – what are YOU doing to not make it worse?
      • “Results-oriented” as one of worst for intellectual work – need a process.
    • Story of “something is happening” is not a good story. Hard to read journalism now for him because they’re both “non-consensus”.
      • She’s optimistic that people can be equipped to parse narrative to be more rational. Pessimistic of framing and storytelling currently.
      • “Not making a decision” is making a decision but we don’t think of it that way.
        • Really unhappy in a position. Did the time frame thing “Will you be annoyed in 1 year?” – Yes. Nondecision didn’t feel like decision.
      • Mentions not having kids – time, energy, heart and decisions associated with indecision.
    • On individual decision, you have: clear misses, near-misses, clear hits
      • Bias toward missing – don’t want to stick neck out. Have to see it in aggregate. Forecasts.
        • Anti-portfolio / shadow book is really about when you include clear misses vs near-misses.
        • Fear is that the ones that hit are less volatile or less risky will be returning less than shadow portfolio.
      • Says it’s difficult to do with 99:1 turndown vs investments. Sampling.
        • Time traveling with portfolio – bounce out and see if “if this is 1 of 20 in portfolio” vs “invest vs not”
    • Conveying confidence vs certainty
      • I’ve done my analysis. This is my forecast. Is there some piece of information I can find out that would change my forecast?
        • Bake it into the decision. Not modulating the forecast – 60% to 57%. Costs and time differences.
      • Putting confidence interval on earliest dates and another probability, inclusive, on latest day
        • “I can have it to you on Friday 67% of time and by Monday 95% of time.”
        • Terrible to ask “Am I sure?” or others “Are you sure” compared to “How sure are you?”
    • Pre-mortems in decision analysis
      • Positive fantasizing vs negative fantasizing (30% closer to success by thinking of hurdles in front of you)
      • What happens if you ask out crush and they say yes? What happens if you ask out crush and they say no? – No’s more likely.
      • Teams get seen as naysayers – individually write a narrative on pre-mortem – good team-player is how do you fail?
      • After outcome, we overweight regret – don’t need to improve this much. Look out a year and see if it affects you.
  • Mary Gray, author of Ghost Work: How to Stop SV from Building a New Global Underclass (Wharton XM)
    51zsewdgdol._sx331_bo1204203200_

    • Research with coauthor at Microsoft Institute
    • Discussion of the b2b services that run in the background – used Uber’s partner as example for driver verification ID
      • Beard vs no beard on default, for instance – need close to 100% accuracy and algorithms/vision can’t pick that up just yet
    • Humans that run mechanical turk or various tasks on classifications
    • Technology used to be cat vs dog and now it’s species of dog – likely tech will enable more specific classifications but not remove intervention
      • Running with surveys, captioning, translations, transcription, verifying location, beta testing are all tasks
    • Used another example for “chick flick” meaning or 2012 debate with Romney’s “binder full of women” comment
      • Needed humans to assign relevance and to provide or connect proper context (Twitter, for instance)
    • Facebook and its content moderators, most social media companies do this
  • Trends in Blockchain Computing, (A16z, 5/18/19)
    • Get paid for AI data or encrypted data – can still train a model on it but nobody would know exactly what the data is
      • Long term accrual – depends, also, on if it’s on AWS vs open-source
    • Gold farming and ex-protocol websites in WoW, for instance – virtual worlds

Push Ahead with Technology – Robots, Retail, Blockchain (Notes from Dec 17 – 23) January 10, 2019

Posted by Anthony in Automation, Blockchain, experience, finance, social, Uncategorized.
Tags: , , , , , , ,
add a comment

First week back for most people. Hope it hasn’t been too chaotic. Schedule-wise, I was expecting craziness but it seems that everyone’s trying to adjust, so changes have been aplenty. Somewhat with a theme of resolutions and just personal improvement as I had time to mull and reflect, I had retreated a few months ago from my book-goal. So, that’s begun again, starting with Meditations by Marcus Aurelius, offered at Project Gutenberg.

330px-Project_Gutemberg_logo.svg_

Then, I heard this morning, though I forget which segment it was, that there is a woman who writes weekly blogs for progress of weekly/monthly goals. That’s quite the inspiration! I’m not against resolutions, but the segment host / guest made great points in that they can fail often due to not being measurable (‘be happier’, ‘lose weight’ – measurable, but not succinct enough, ‘walk more’). So, accountability and something where you can SEE/REFLECT on how you’re doing is more actionable.

In light of that, I am going to make an effort to go back to ending my showers with 1min cold water (this morning: 1 for 1), read more (thru 3 books/chapters of Meditations), and attend at least 1 meet-up for the month (Smartly had one today but I’m going to attend next week’s in SF).

  • Scott Peters, SAM and Robotic Construction (Wharton XM)
    CR-Logo-278x80

    • CEO of Construction Robotics, talked about his SAM (semi-automated mason) that can lay 350-400 bricks an hour
      • No fatigue, just operation and planning goes into it
      • Ideal for commercial scenarios – large, long walls – set-up time
    • Specs for robotic-enabled to see if there’s a cost saving, time saving or profit margin for company
      • Work with customers to make sure it is feasible and makes sense
  • Doug Bewsher (@dougino), Author at Leadspace (Wharton XM)
    • Didn’t start as a journalist / author – was a CEO brought in for expertise for his marketing skills
      • Prior CMO Salesforce, CMO Skype, co-led McKinsey’s CRM practice
  • Caitlin Long (@caitlinlong_), former Morgan Stanley MD (Wharton XM)
    • Focusing on state-level support in the digital assets industry in Wyoming
    • Blockchain friendly bank – focused on that type of risk (more risk, so banks don’t want to enable)
    • Asset- and debt-based business and discussing blockchain as something different altogether
  • Stephen Sadove – former Saks 5th, Mastercard Senior Adviser
    • Data from holiday says that the Sunday before Christmas is the most busiest day of the year (ahead of Black Friday / Cyber Monday)
    • Shoppers in many aspects are increasing, except for say, electronics and big box retailers
    • Across the wave, and sections (“cozy” items)
      • Stores take advantage and share on the success

 

%d bloggers like this: